Pitchfork and Pen—Critter Not

I live in a very rural area by choice. In Texas, some call acreage the size of ours a “ranchette.” I think it’s just a farm and doesn’t need a fancy name. Continue reading “Pitchfork and Pen—Critter Not”

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Pitchfork and Pen—Office Supply Addict

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Recently I responded to a fellow writer’s Facebook post after she made a trip into an office supply store. Soon, a conversation ensued and several of us admitted to having a strange fascination for these places.

Continue reading “Pitchfork and Pen—Office Supply Addict”

Progress

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Finally!

Today I sent the last of the manuscript for book three in the Knights of Kismera series to my editor.

I can breathe a sigh of relief now. I had begun to wonder if I was ever going to finish The Dragon’s Tear.

I was about halfway through when the dreaded writer’s block happened—two months of nothing. Usually, I couldn’t write more than a line or two. Then the next day I would read over it and reject it.

I couldn’t even come up with blog posts or my newsletter. It was torture. UGH!!!!!Screen Shot 2017-08-14 at 11.19.04 AM.png

Then, one day it was as if the fog just blew away. The characters had things to say, and when I had time to write I couldn’t get it down fast enough. I still didn’t get the other writing responsibilities done, but it was because I was putting all of my energy into the manuscript.

I was discussing the progress of my writing and how I hated writer’s block with my family one day. My daughter looked at me and very calmly said, “But Mom, you get it at some point with every book.”

I thought it over and she was right. I lock up with every project. No clue why, but it happens with each novel.

Now I’m sitting here with mixed emotions. Is it just a normal part of my process? Do I have this issue to look forward to for any future work? Does that involuntary break make my writing better? Is being a frustrated writer “cool”?

The good news is that I have no shortage of ideas for future novels. I have at least four more in the file box in the back of my brain, as well as a few ideas that could become novellas.

So the plan of action is this: decide on the next project, sit down, start writing, and don’t sweat something that may or may not happen.

Read more from Tamara Hartl!